Craftsman Weed Eater How to & Troubleshooting Guide

As far as weed eaters go, the Craftsman brand is a great option. Not only does the brand provides a wide range of options, but it also allows you to modify the weed eater for cutting purposes. Unfortunately, it is prone to breaking down just like any other gadget.

Keep reading to learn how to troubleshoot and fix your Craftsman weed eater.

How to string a craftsman weed eater

Craftsman gas-powered Weed eaters are equipped with two types of cutting heads: a fixed-line head or an optional trimmer head. Craftsman recommends using only brand-name lines. Use the green line for cutting the grass only. Redline is intended for grass and small weeds. Install a black line for large weeds and a small brush.

Fixed-line Heads

  • With a stiff brush, clean debris from the cutting head. Look at the cutting head and determine which holes you need to use to feed the line. Insert red and green lines into the holes marked “small.” Feed black line into the holes marked “large.”
  • Craftsman gas-powered Weed eaters are equipped with two types of cutting heads: a fixed-line head or an optional trimmer head.
  • Use the green line for cutting the grass only.
  • Insert one end of the line through one of the correct size holes in the cutting head. Feed it through to about half the length of the line. Insert the other end of the line into the other hole of the same size. Feed it through to a similar length.
  • Grasp one end of the line and insert it through the positioning tunnel, on the same side as you inserted that end through the cutting head hole. Do the same with the other end of the line and the corresponding positioning tunnel.
  • Grasp both ends of the line and pull tightly in either direction. Check to see that the portion of the line between the cutting head holes is tight against the hub. Check also to see that both ends of the line are approximately the same length.
  • Insert one end of the line through one of the correct size holes in the cutting head.
  • Insert the other end of the line into the other hole of the same size.
  • Optional-line Heads
  • Pull on the tap button of the head to remove the spool. Set the Craftsman Weed eater aside. With a stiff brush, clean any debris from the spool and hub.
  • With a tape measure and garden shears or scissors, measure and cut two strands of line, each 12 ½ feet long. Insert the end of one strand of line ½ an inch into one of the small holes on the spool. Do the same for the other strand.
  • Hold the spool in one hand and grasp both strands of line in the other hand. Wind the strands tightly around the spool in the direction indicated by the arrows on the spool. Stop when 5 to 7 inches of the unwound line are left on each strand.
  • Pull on the tap button of the head to remove the spool.
  • With a stiff brush, clean any debris from the spool and hub.
  • Holding the line tight against the spool, insert the unwound end of one of the strands into one of the notches on the spool to hold it in place. Repeat this with the other unwound end. There should be 3 to 5 inches of a line stretching from each notched.
  • Grasp the Weed eater hub in one hand. On the other hand, insert one end of the line stretching from a notch through the corresponding exit hole on the hub. Take care not to release the line from the notch. Insert the other line through the other exit hole so that the two ends of the line do not cross.
  • Holding the line tight against the spool, insert the unwound end of one of the strands into one of the notches on the spool to hold it in place.
  • On the other hand, insert one end of the line stretching from a notch through the corresponding exit hole on the hub.
  • Place the center hole in the spool over the drive shaft on the hub. Push the spool onto the hub so that it snaps securely. Grasp one strand of line in each hand. Pull the strands away from the head until you feel them release from the notches.
  • Hold one strand of line and stretch it across to the opposite side of the head. With scissors or garden shears, cut the length of the line so that it is no longer than the diameter of the head. Do the same with the other strand.
  • Place the center hole in the spool over the drive shaft on the hub.
  • Push the spool onto the hub so that it snaps securely.

Note: Craftsman also sells pre-wound spools of line for use with optional-line heads.

How to string a craftsman weed eater with two holes

Dual-sided spools are the best for thicker weeds. Unfortunately, two holes are a little more complicated to re-spool than one.

You can easily string the dual-sided weed eater spool with the right tools and follow these steps.

1. Turn off your weed eater

Unplug from the mains if you have an electric corded weed eater.

If it’s gas-powered, press the off button, and you can also disconnect the spark plug for safety.

If you have been using the weed whacker, don’t open the spool head immediately; the trimmer head could be too hot to touch, so let it cool.

Remove Spool Back to String a Weed Eater

2. Remove Spool Back

Once the trimmer head is cool, remove the spool back. You’ll find most covers held in position by multiple tabs. Squeeze the release tabs together to release.

Screws hold in other covers, so you’ll need the right size screwdriver to remove the screws on your string trimmer cover.

Remove the spool from the trimmer.

3. Discard Old Weed Eater String

Grass clippings and dirt need removing from the lawn trimmer cutting head and spool before pulling off any old line and discarding it.

4. Check String Weed Eaters Operator Manual

Check the manual of your weed eater to see how much trimmer line your spool needs. A good rule is to wind a 12–15-foot length of string trimmer line.

The goal is to avoid overfilling the spool with the right length of the new line to the point it bulges. You won’t get the cover back on the spool if you do.

5. Fold Line and Cut

Take this fresh line and feed it straight into the spool’s center slot, folded point down. Then, with your index finger in between the lines, hold it in place.

Keep your thumb and other fingers holding the lines taut while you draw these lines.

Turn the spool so the lines wind clockwise around the spool and check each spool’s guide has one line.

6. Locate Two Holes

Locate the two holes from which the two strings emerge on the exterior of the spool. Leave around 12 inches of line unwound after winding the line around the spool.

Place these lines through the exit holes in the spool where each hole has the right string in it.

7. Slide Spool Into the Cover.

Make that the lines can still move freely when you replace the spool.

Replace the weed whacker trimmer head’s cover. The line should be clipped to a length no longer than the weed eater’s shield’s limiter blade.

8. Start Your Engine

Start the engine or motor and check you have a sufficient line to get rid of all your other unwanted plants.

How to restring a craftsman weed eater

If you use it exclusively as a line trimmer, you’ll have to change the line frequently because the head accepts only a short length. Using a Black or red braided Craftsman line is recommended.

  • Unplug the trimmer or remove the battery. If it’s a gas-powered model, pull the spark plug boot off the plug to prevent the trimmer from accidentally starting.
  • Lay the tool on a flat surface with the head facing toward you.
  • Pull the guide plate off the top of the head.
  • Remove the old lines left, clean the spool with a rag and replace the guide plate.
  • Turn it to the “A” position if you’re using a medium-gauge red or large-gauge black replacement line.
  • Turn the guide plate to the “B” position if you’re using a line thinner than either.
  • Fold a length of line that is about 18 inches long in half.
  • Insert one end through one of the holes in the hub and the other end through the other hole.
  • Pull the line to extend it all the way out. It should align itself within the positioning tunnels on the head.
  • Turn the head and pull the line out toward the safety guard.
  • Cut off any that extends beyond the guard using a knife.
  • Cut the other line to the same length.

How to install a two-line spool in a craftsman weed eater

Weed eaters come with single and dual-sided spools, and each manufacturer has its own specifications for how much line should be placed on the spool, what direction it should be wound, and the diameter size of line that should be used.

Some dual-sided spools should have the lines wound in the same direction, while others require the lines to be wrapped in opposite directions. The Craftsman model 358.791590 weed eater has a dual-sided spool that takes a 0.095-inch line that is loaded onto the spool in the same direction.

Note: Replace the line on your trimmer quicker by purchasing a pre-wound spool of line. This eliminates winding the line onto the spool. When winding the line onto the spool, work in even rows rather than letting the line crisscross. This will allow the line to feed out without becoming tangled.

  1. Turn off the weed eater by unplugging it, if electric, or pressing the off button for a gas engine. If the cutting head is hot to the touch, allow it to cool enough that you will not burn yourself when removing the spool.
  2. Remove the spool by squeezing together the release tabs on the cover of the trimmer head. The cover and spool will detach from the trimmer. Pull off any line that is left on the spool and discard it. Clean away any dirt and grass clippings on the cutting head and spool.
  3. Cut a piece of line to the length indicated in your trimmer’s operator’s manual. This will vary by manufacturer, the Craftsman model 358.791590 requires 15 feet. The objective is not to fill the spool to the point that the line is bulging off the spool. An overfilled spool will not fit back into the cover, warns Backyard Workshop. Underfilling the spool will not cause any problems. You just will have to refill the spool more often.
  4. Fold the length of the line you cut in two, insert the line into the center slot of the spool at the folded point. Place your index finger between the lines and hold the lines taut using your thumb and other fingers. Using your other hand, turn the spool so that the lines wind around the spool in a clockwise direction simultaneously, with one line in each guide of the spool, instructs the Allen Brothers.
  5. Locate the exit holes on the outside of the spool. Wind the lines onto the spool, leaving about 12 inches of the lines unwound. Push the ends of the lines through the exit holes, one line per hole, and slide the spool back into the cover. Make sure the lines can move freely. Snap the cover back onto the cutting head of the weed eater. Trim lines so they are no longer than the line limiter blade on the trimmer’s shield.

Items Needed

  • Weed eater with dual-sided spool
  • Package of new line sized for your trimmer

Note: Only use the specified diameter size of the line rated for your weed eater, listed in the operator’s manual. String too large for your weed eater will become lodged in the trimmer’s holes and not feed out. Check the operator’s manual for the correct size and method for restringing your weed eater.

How to wind a craftsman weed eater spool

Wind string trimmer spools in the direction of the arrow on the spool. If there’s no arrow, wind in the direction opposite to the rotation of the trimmer head.

Wind Against the Direction of Spin

Absent any other indication of which direction to wind a string trimmer spool, physics tells you to wind in the direction opposite to that of rotation. If the head spins clockwise, wind the string counterclockwise and vice versa.

If you do this, the force of the string striking whatever it’s cutting will tighten it and pull it out of the head. If you wind the string the other way, the cutting force will loosen it and push it back into the head, which may disappear altogether.

A simple observation will tell you what direction the head rotates, but it’s hard to maintain the orientation when you turn the trimmer over and remove the spool from the head. It helps to have an indicator on the spool to prevent you from losing your sense of direction and avoid putting the spool back upside down. It turns out there is one.

Look for Arrows on the Spool

If you consult InstructionSheets.com for a Weed Eater user manual, you’ll find an instruction to wind the string in the direction of the arrows found on the spool.

The arrows are imprinted on the top of the spool, and although they aren’t painted a different color to highlight them, they’re still pretty prominent and hard to miss. You’ll also find these arrows on string trimmer spools from other manufacturers.

If you come across a string trimmer – Weed Eater or otherwise – that doesn’t have an arrow on the trimmer head, trust physics and wind in the direction opposite the spin. That way, you’ll be sure that the string will feed out as you work rather than slipping back inside the trimmer head.

If you suspect the manufacturer may have something else in mind, your best bet is to look up the manual for your model on the manufacturer’s website.

Why won’t my gas craftsman weed eater start?

The engine needs gas, compression, and spark in order to start. First, ensure there’s fresh gas in the tank-old gas accumulates water and burns poorly. Replace the fuel if it’s old. Add a fuel stabilizer to the gas when you refill the tank to help keep the fuel fresh.

If the fuel is fresh, check the fuel lines for cracks. Air enters the carburetor instead of fuel when the fuel lines have cracks. Replace the fuel lines if you find cracks in the lines. If the fuel lines are okay, you may need to rebuild or replace the carburetor because a dirty carburetor won’t supply the engine with fuel.

Next, disconnect the spark plug wire and remove the spark plug. Replace the spark plug if you see deposits or corrosion on the electrodes.

Finally, to check for compression, remove the spark plug, press your thumb over the opening and pull the starter cord. If you don’t feel the air pushing from the cylinder, the piston rings likely need to be replaced (for an accurate compression reading, use a compression gauge).

Fuel Issues

A gasoline-powered weed trimmer that won’t start may have a fuel-related problem. First and foremost, check whether or not enough fuel to power the trimmer is in its fuel tank. If the fuel level is low, the trimmer may not start. Fill the tank, and try to start the trimmer.

However, if the fuel is left over from last year, it should be replaced with fresh gasoline. Ensure that you have the proper mixture of 2-cycle oil and gasoline for your Weed Eater trimmer. The Weed Eater company recommends using unleaded gasoline mixed with 2-cycle oil at a ratio of 40 parts unleaded gasoline to 1 part 2-cycle oil.

Spark Plug Problems

If the Weed Eater trimmer refuses to respond when you try to start it, it may have a dirty or faulty spark plug. Cleaning the spark plug with a wire brush to remove corrosion or dirt may allow a connection that restores the trimmer to working order.

If cleaning the spark plug doesn’t do the trick, then simply pull off the spark plug cover, and remove the old spark plug. Install a new spark plug, replace the spark plug cover and try starting the trimmer again.

Other Malfunctions

Sometimes too many attempts to start a trimmer can result in a flooded engine. In that case, position the trimmer’s choke lever to “Run,” and pull the cord to remove excess fuel. That procedure may require several repetitions until the engine starts.

A clogged air filter also can cause a trimmer to remain dormant. Check the air filter for dirt and debris. If necessary, clean and replace the air filter before trying to start the machine again. A dirty or clogged fuel filter may keep fuel from reaching the carburetor. Remove the old fuel filter, and replace it with a new one before trying to start the trimmer again.

Guidelines For Troubleshooting A Gas Weed Eater That Won’t Start

1) Check The Gasoline

Gasoline can break down in as little as 30 days, especially today’s ethanol-containing gas.

Homeowners sometimes stash their string trimmer in the garage at season’s end without stabilizing the gas. Oxygen has all winter to break down and ruin the gasoline, leaving you with a trimmer that won’t start in the spring.

If your trimmer falls into this category, empty the old gas from the fuel tank and replace it with fresh fuel.

Clean the carburetor if your gas weed eater won’t start. If your weed eater won’t start, try removing the air filter and spraying carburetor cleaner into the intake.

2) Clean The Carburettor

Once gas breaks down, varnish, gums, and other debris can form inside the carburetor and clog the tiny fuel passages. This prevents fuel from reaching the combustion chamber and igniting, leaving you to struggle with a trimmer that won’t start.

Remove the air filter and spray carburetor cleaner into the intake. Let it sit for several minutes to help loosen and dissolve varnish. Replace the filter and try starting the trimmer.

If this doesn’t solve the problem, consider disassembling the carburetor to give it a more thorough cleaning.

Beware, however – taking apart a carburetor marks a point-of-no-return of sorts. Understanding how the delicate gaskets, tiny screws, and needle valves go back together can be challenging, even on a simple string-trimmer carburetor. Take pictures with your phone throughout the process to help reassemble. Clean all the openings and passages with carburetor cleaner.

If you’re reluctant to take apart the carb, visit the servicing dealer.

The clean spark plug on the gas weed eater that won’t start. Remove the spark plug and use light sandpaper to clean electrode deposits to help fix a gas trimmer that won’t start.

3) Clean/Replace Spark Plug

Oil deposits and carbon can foul the spark plug in a two-stroke engine if low-quality oil is used. Deposits on the electrode prevent the plug from firing properly, reducing performance or preventing the engine from running altogether.

Plugs are inexpensive, so replace it if it’s fouled. If you don’t have a new plug available, clean the deposits from the electrode with light-duty sandpaper and check the gap. Consult the owner’s manual for the correct gap size.

If you know the spark plug is good, but the engine still doesn’t produce a spark, the coil is likely to blame and requires replacement.

Direct compressed air from the inside of the air filter toward the outside to remove debris that may be restricting airflow.

4) Clean/Replace Air Filter

A clogged air filter prevents the engine from receiving sufficient air to operate properly.

Before removing the air filter, brush away loose debris around the filter cover and the element. Tap rigid filters on a tabletop or the palm of your hand to dislodge any dirt or debris. Compressed air also works well. Make sure you direct air through the filter from the inside to avoid lodging debris deeper in the filter.

Avoid washing paper filters, as this can collapse their microfine structure. Foam filters, however, can easily be washed using mild detergent and warm water.

As with the spark plug, however, replacement is often the best practice, especially if the filter is excessively dirty.

5) Clean The Spark-Arrestor Screen

On many trimmers, a small screen covers the exhaust outlet and prevents sparks from exiting the muffler and potentially starting a fire.

As with plug fouling, too much oil in the gasoline, inferior oil, and continued low-rpm operation can plug the screen with carbon deposits. This prevents exhaust-gas flow, which leads to power loss. In extreme cases, heavy deposits choke airflow enough to leave you with a weed eater that won’t start.

To fix the problem, remove the spark-arrestor screen and spray it with a heavy-duty cleaner, like AMSOIL Power Foam®, to soften the deposits before cleaning the screen with an abrasive pad. Reinstall the screen and test the trimmer.

Replace the screen altogether if it’s excessively plugged with carbon.

Electric craftsman weed eater won’t start

When an electric Weed Eater trimmer won’t start, sometimes the most probable cause actually is the cause. Check an electric trimmer to ensure its extension cord is plugged firmly into the machine and plugged firmly into an electrical outlet.

A faulty extension cord also may be the problem. A quick fix can be performed by swapping the faulty extension cord for another extension cord that is in working order. Also, ensure the trimmer’s switch is in the “On” position.

Performing a quick check of the fuse or circuit breaker that governs the electrical outlet into which the Weed Eater is plugged is practical to ensure no problem exists with the electric power.

How to Troubleshoot an Electric Weed Trimmer That Will Not Start

Step 1: Check the Plug

Follow the power cord to the electrical outlet. Make sure all three prongs are fully inserted, and the outlet is switched on, if possible. Disconnect any extension cords that haven’t been approved for use with your string trimmer type; they might not be rated high enough for the electrical demand.

Step 2: Test the Outlet

Test the outlet with a lamp. Check your circuit breakers or fuses if the bulb doesn’t light. An electrical fault or power surge could have tripped the breaker or blown the fuse regulating the weed trimmer’s circuit. Reset the breaker or replace the fuse and try the tool again.

Step 3: Review the Starting Procedure

Ensure you’re following the correct starting procedure. Some models might require you to hold down the safety switch before you press the “Start” button. The safety button or lever prevents kids from starting the appliance. Check your instruction manual for the exact starting instructions.

Step 4: Empty the Collection Basket

If necessary, empty the grass collection basket and check to ensure nothing is blocking the blades. Always unplug your string trimmer before examining the blades or trimmer head. Brush away any sticks, or compacted grass gathered around the blades and try the tool again.

How to remove craftsman weed eater head

Some models of Craftsman trimmers require you to remove the head of the trimmer to replace the line or conduct other maintenance, such as cleaning.

Step 1

Deactivate your trimmer and remove it from any power source. Unplug the electrical plug or disconnect your unit’s spark plug wire so the trimmer cannot accidentally activate while you work. Make sure the engine is cool before you start to work.

Step 2

Turn the trimmer upside down so the head faces up toward you. Locate two push tabs on each side of the trimmer head cover.

Step 3

Depress each tab simultaneously, releasing the head from the rest of the trimmer. Pull the head straight off the trimmer. Depending on your model, a spring may come loose with the head. Store the spring in a safe place while you work so that you do not lose it.

Craftsman weed eater pull cord not catching

If your weed eater has a gas-powered engine, it has a pull cord to start it, and if that cord doesn’t work, neither will the string trimmer.

Servicing the pull cord on a lawn mower is usually simple, but not so on a string trimmer. The problem is that you usually have to disassemble the entire motor housing to get to the pull cord recoil housing. Once you do, you’ll probably have to replace the spring because that’s the part that often fails. You might also have to replace the cord or the entire pulley mechanism if it has cracked.

The three most common problems that can arise with a pull cord are:

  • The cord is broken.
  • The cord is stuck.
  • The cord won’t retract.

You usually need access to the recoil mechanism to fix these problems, although if the cord is simply stuck, you might be able to free it by giving it an extra-hard tug. If the cord won’t retract, it may also be because something is tangled inside the recoil housing, but more often, the problem is a broken spring. Either way, you need to get into the recoil mechanism to fix it.

The pull cord starts your weed trimmer, and if it doesn’t work, or it won’t retract, your trimmer isn’t going to be of much use. The starter connects to the engine flywheel, and its position on the trimmer housing varies from model to model. If the starter won’t turn, there could be a problem with the starting mechanism, such as a broken spring, but the problem could also be with another part of the trimmer.

Recoil Starter Problems

The starting mechanism on a gas trimmer consists of a spring-loaded hub around which the rope is wound. The hub connects to the engine flywheel, and when you pull the rope, the flywheel spins to initiate combustion and get the trimmer going.

Although it doesn’t happen often, rope can cross over itself on recoil and get stuck. It’s also possible for the recoil spring, which is similar to the spring in a wind-up watch, to break. You must remove the starter assembly from the housing to solve either of these problems.

Engine Seizure

Because the recoil starter is connected to the engine flywheel, difficulty pulling the starting rope can signify a problem with the engine. A two-cycle trimmer engine can seize if you forget to put oil in the gas, or if you put in too little.

You may be able to restore operation by adding oil to the gas, removing the spark plug and pulling the rope gently to lubricate the crankshaft. The engine also can seize for a more benign reason — the air filter or spark arrestor may be dirty and preventing air circulation. The air filter is under an easy-to-remove cover; you can access and clean the spark arrestor by removing the muffler cover.

Broken Clutch

Most trimmers have a centrifugal clutch that keeps the drive shaft from engaging with the engine flywheel until the trimmer is running and you depress the throttle lever. If the clutch springs are broken, the clutch won’t disengage, and the drive shaft turns when you pull the starter rope.

The trimmer head also spins; if the head is on the ground or its movement is restricted, the starter won’t turn. The remedy is to replace the clutch, which is a procedure that varies from model to model.

Accessing the Starter

The ease with which you can access the starter mechanism to untangle the rope or replace the spring depends on where it’s located on your trimmer. You probably won’t have much trouble if it’s located on the main housing; you can unscrew it from the engine after removing the housing cover.

You may have a bit more trouble if it’s behind the drive shaft housing because you’ll have to remove the drive shaft and possibly the clutch to get to it. Consult your owner’s manual, available online at the manufacturer’s website, for servicing tips if you aren’t sure how to proceed.

How to Access the Recoil Mechanism

On some string trimmers, the starter recoil mechanism is mounted on the engine housing, often near the muffler. If yours is one of these, you must remove a few screws and a plastic cover to uncover the starter. However, some models require a fair amount of extra disassembly because the recoil mechanism is inside the engine housing directly behind the clutch. To get to it, you have to do the following, using your owner’s manual as a guide for model-specific procedures:

Step 1: Remove the Trimmer Shaft From the Engine Housing

Using a screwdriver, remove the screws holding the trimmer shaft in place and disconnect any wires. Disconnect the throttle cable from the carburetor using needle-nose pliers to lift it off its bracket. Separate the shaft and set it aside.

Step 2: Bind the Piston

Remove the spark plug and stuff a rag or piece of rope into the spark plug hole. This procedure is necessary to prevent the engine from turning when you remove the clutch drum.

Step 3: Unscrew and Remove the Clutch Drum

Insert a screwdriver into the shaft in the middle of the clutch drum and turn it counterclockwise to remove the screw. Pull the drum off the shaft.

Step 4: Remove the Clutch Plates

Wedge a flat-head screwdriver on the end of one of the clutch plates and tap it with a hammer to turn the plate counterclockwise. The shock should free it enough to allow you to unscrew it by hand. Repeat with the other clutch plate.

Step 5: Disassemble the Motor Housing

Remove the screws connecting the two halves of the motor housing and separate the halves to expose the motor and the starter assembly. Depending on the model, you may have to unscrew and remove a retaining plate to access the recoil mechanism.

Servicing the Recoil Mechanism

The pulley is usually held to the shaft by a retaining ring that you should be able to pull off with your fingers or with pliers. You’ll find a spring under this ring. Be sure to save it. Once the ring and spring are gone, you can remove the pulley.

Behind it, you’ll find a recoil spring, much like the one you see in mechanical watches. If you have to replace this spring, which you probably do, purchase a kit that includes both the spring and its housing. You don’t want to get stuck with the job of forcing a new spring into the old housing.

To reassemble the starter mechanism, ensure the recoil spring is in place; then, place the pulley on the shaft, align it with the notches, and push it down.

  • Turn the pulley six or seven times counterclockwise to wind the spring and maintain tension by pushing it down.
  • Thread the cord through the motor housing and the pulley and tie a knot in the end. Replace the pulley spring and the pulley cap while you continue to maintain tension on the pulley.
  • After that’s done, allow the pulley to recoil slowly, automatically blowing the cord until the handle is flush against the motor housing.
  • You’re now ready to reassemble the trimmer by reversing the disassembly procedure.

How to Replace the Pull Cord on a Craftsman Weed eater

Craftsman is a name of quality tools owned, operated, and sold at Sears retail stores. Craftsman offers many options for the home and property owner, one of which is a line of weed eaters, or trimmers, as they are commonly known.

Like nearly anything mechanical, some DIY maintenance is required to keep the trimmer working. In this case, that may mean replacing the pull-starter cord on a gas-powered Craftsman model 358.

Set the weed eater out on a flat and stable surface and use a Phillips head screwdriver to remove all the holding screws that anchor the cover over the starter, which is located at the rear of the whacker’s engine near the exhaust valve. Unscrew the screws, remove them and place them in a cup to prevent them from rolling off and possibly getting lost.

Pull the cover loose from the whacker; the starter cord assembly is anchored to the inside of the cover, so be ready to catch the pulley in case it is loose inside the casing. Unravel the coiled cord, or what remains of it if the cord has broken. Once you get to the end of the cord, depress the lock tab to release the end and free it from the pulley.

Set the weed eater out on a flat and stable surface and use a Phillips head screwdriver to remove all the holding screws that anchor the cover over the starter, which is located at the rear of the whacker’s engine near the exhaust valve.

  • Open up the new cord’s packaging and thread the plastic end of the cord through the hole by again depressing the lock tab.
  • Tug slightly on the cord once it is locked into place to ensure its snug or else you will repeat the process once you jerk the cord out as you try to start the whacker.
  • Hold the cord taut and slowly wrap coils of the cord around the pulley.
  • Once you get to the end, tie a loose fitting knot in the cord, then slide the knot down, so it is flush with the metal tab on the inside of the pulley.

Tug again on the wound cord to add tension to the recoil spring, then place the pulley back inside the cover. Snap the cover in place on the rear of the whacker and re-screw the holding screws in place. Make sure you have gas in the engine, then give the cord a strong tug to ensure the cord is properly locked in place.

Open up the new cord’s packaging and thread the plastic end of the cord through the hole by again depressing the lock tab.

Tug again on the wound cord to add tension to the recoil spring, then place the pulley back inside the cover.

How to Repair the Fuel Line on My Craftsman Weed Eater

A Craftsman weed eater uses a rubber hose to suction fuel up from the gas tank to the carburetor. This rubber hose will degrade over time and cause gas leaks, air leaks or starve the carburetor of fuel. Repairing the fuel line on these models requires fuel line replacement, as the rubber hoses will get damaged during their removal. Fuel lines require seasonal replacement at a minimum, or more often if you often work in dusty, dirty conditions.

Unscrew the fuel tank’s cap and empty all remaining fuel into the fuel canister. Push the primer bulb twice and start up the engine, if you can, to burn off the last remaining fuel in the system. Let the engine die.

A Craftsman weed eater uses a rubber hose to suction fuel up from the gas tank to the carburettor.

  1. Unscrew the bolts retaining the air filter and muffler cover to the rear of the engine. Pull out the air filter pad from the engine. Locate the fuel lines on the elbow connectors of the carburettor. Disconnect both lines from the carburettor using your fingers.
  2. Unhook the throttle cable — the metal wire attached to the side of the carburettor — using your needle-nosed pliers. Unscrew the two mounting bolts fastening the carburettor’s choke plate to the carburettor. Remove the choke plate.
  3. Unscrew the bolts retaining the air filter and muffler cover to the rear of the engine.
  4. Unscrew the two mounting bolts fastening the carburettor to the engine. Unscrew the top retaining screw holding the fuel tank to the engine. Lift out the entire fuel system — gas tank, fuel lines and carburettor — all together.
  5. Reach into the fuel tank with the hook and pull off the fuel filter from the main gas line. Pull out both fuel lines from the tank, remembering the holes for the main hose (where the filter just was) and the return hose. You’ll need to insert the new fuel hoses into their proper holes. Pull off the rubber grommet, if present, from the main fuel line.
  6. Unscrew the two mounting bolts fastening the carburettor to the engine.
  7. Pull out both fuel lines from the tank, remembering the holes for the main hose (where the filter just was) and the return hose.
  8. Cut two lengths of new fuel tubing, both about 8 inches long. Push the new lines through the holes on the fuel tank. Attach the new fuel filter to the main fuel line — the same hole you removed it from — and push them into the bottom of the tank. Position the return fuel line so about 2 inches stick into the tank. Position the main fuel line so about 3 inches remains in the fuel tank. Cut off any excess line on the rear.
  9. Refit the fuel tank and fuel lines to the engine. Place the carburettor onto the engine. Tighten down the fuel tank’s screw. Tighten down the mounting bolts for the carburettor. Reconnect the fuel lines to their respective valves on the carburettor: the main fuel line, with the fuel filter, connects to the intake valve, and the return line connects to the outtake valve.
  10. Cut two lengths of new fuel tubing, both about 8 inches long.
  11. Position the return fuel line so about 2 inches stick into the tank.
  12. Refit the choke cover plate and tighten its mounting bolts. Reconnect the throttle cable to the side of the carburettor. Replace the foam filter and set the air filter and muffler cover back onto the engine.

How to replace gas lines on a craftsman weed eater

Tools required

  • Needle-nose pliers
  • Approved fuel container
  • Scissors
  • Small screwdriver
  • Wire hanger (optional)
  • Work gloves
  • Paper towels or shop rags

Follow the steps in this repair guide to complete weed eater fuel line replacement;

  1. Disconnect the spark plug wire from the spark plug and ensure that it cannot make contact with the plug. Pour the gasoline from the trimmer into a gas can. Use a funnel to ensure that there is no spillage and that the gas flows easily into the can.
  2. Pull the two fuel lines off the carburettor by hand or with a pair of needle-nose pliers. A small amount of fuel may leak from the lines. If so, simply wipe it up before proceeding.
  3. Unscrew the two screws that hold the gas tank onto the Weed Eater trimmer with a Torx T25 screwdriver. Lay the screws aside in a safe place. Remove the gas tank from the trimmer.
  4. Pull the two lines out of the trimmer, one at a time. Dispose of the damaged fuel lines. When you pull the fuel lines from the trimmer, a small cylindrical fuel line filter will pop off the thin line leading into the tank. Lay it aside so you can reattach it to the new line during installation.
  5. Feed the new, thinner fuel line into the gas tank in the same hole from which you removed the damaged one. Push it through small hole and out the large hole where the lid for the gas tank goes. If necessary, use a pair of bent needle-nose pliers to grasp the fuel line and pull it through. Attach the fuel line filter to the end of the tube and push it back through the big opening. Feed enough fuel line into the tank until the fuel line filter sits at the bottom of the tank.
  6. Feed the thicker fuel line into the hole from which you removed the damaged one. Shove the fuel line just enough into the tank until it reaches its bottom.
  7. Reattach the gas tank to the Weed Eater trimmer with the Torx screws that held it in place originally. Reattach the fuel lines to the carburettor in the same positions as they were originally placed. Reconnect the spark plug wire.

Note:  Undertaking repairs to appliances can be hazardous. Use the proper tools and safety equipment noted in the guide and follow all instructions. Do not proceed until you are confident that you understand all the steps and can complete the repair. A qualified technician should only perform some repairs.

My craftsman weed eater won’t stay running

There are several reasons why a craftsman battery weed eater won’t stay running. The most common issues are old fuel, clogged fuel filters & dirty carburettor.

Old Fuel

A weed eater or trimmer needs fuel to run on. Just like how our body needs fresh food, weed eaters also need fresh fuel. Old fuel doesn’t properly flow to every part of the engine. It creates friction and stops the functions. So, a craftsman weed eater won’t stay running while using it.

To fix it, remove the old fuel and use the ethanol-free new fuel. Ensure the ratio of gas to oil according to the need. Usually, within 2 or 3 starts, the craftsman weed eater should start running. If it doesn’t start, make sure to contact a professional.

Clogged Fuel Filter

Fuel filters can clog up for sticky carbon residue. Using the wrong fuel ratio or having old fuel for a long time can cause clogged fuel filters. For this clog, fuel can’t pass through the needed place. This stalls the weed eater machine. So, to fix it, deep cleaning of the fuel filter needs to be done. Especially, give emphasis on cleaning all the sticky substances.

If it can’t be cleaned, replace the fuel filter. Lastly, before installing the filter, check for air filters too. A craftsman 25cc weed eater won’t stay running for this reason. Some debris can build up on the air filter because of the old fuel. Removing both can be a bit tricky so try to take professional help.

Piston, Muffler & Exhaust Port

Piston, muffler & exhaust port are three important parts after filters. A craftsman weed eater won’t stay on without them.

Firstly, ensure a gap in the spark plug. Then start looking for carbon build-up above the piston. Mostly it forms crusty dirt over the piston. Try to remove it gently. And replace the piston in case of any worn out.

Afterward, look for a muffler and exhaust port. They both can also be clogged with debris from carbon. Don’t forget to look at the muffler surface. It can hold debris too. Lastly, look out for clogged or worn-out portions in the exhaust port. It would be really time-consuming if three of the parts are clogged. So it’s recommended to consult a professional.

Improper Gas Supply

Improper gas supply is a huge issue in a weed eater. Without proper gas supply definitely, a craftsman 4 cycle weed eater won’t stay running. The gas supply maintains the engine of the trimmer. Improper gas supply is caused for clogged components and leakage in the gas tank.

Commonly this problem happens due to gas tank leakage. Repairing the tank itself is not possible. So, it is recommended to completely change the tank with a new one.

Dirty Carburettor

At the fuel inlet, there is a carburettor plate. As it is closer to the fuel inlet, it can mostly have formed a clog over time. So, remove the carburettor and look for the dirt build-up. Always clean with a carb cleaner.

Ensure proper cleaning in each part, or else craftsman weed eater won’t stay running. Also, always stay alert while using the carb cleaner. You should wear eye protection as it would cause bad irritation to your eyes. Replace the carburettor if it can’t be cleaned.

Gasoline-powered weed trimmers typically work off a two-cycle engine, and need clean fuel, air, and a spark to start – The fuel and the spark start the ignition while the fuel and air combination keep the engine running. Trimmers that will start but sputter out at high speeds or when idling often have issues with air circulation, though there are a multitude of other causes to explore. Let’s start out with some of the easiest.

Store It Properly

Ounce of prevention, pound of cure – Make sure to take fuel out of your hedge trimmer if you’re planning on leaving it in storage for any significant length of time. Your fuel mix can go stale if left out for months at a time and make your trimmer hard to run, while both gas and oil will leave sticky, filter-clogging residues in the tank. A quick clean before storing for the winter can save a lot of effort come spring and summer.

Check Your Air Intake/Exhaust

When running the trimmer’s engine draws air into a combustion chamber via the intake port and then expels the air via the exhaust. Both the exhaust and the intake will need to be regularly cleaned and all air filters replaced on a regular basis – Both are typically easy to access, and replacement filters usually aren’t expensive.

In addition the exhaust port will have a “spark arrestor” located within, designed to catch and block any sparks from the engine – These can easily be cleaned with a wire brush or just replaced like your other filters.

Your Gas Tank Needs Air Too

Most weed eaters will have a small air hole available on the cap to the gas tank – This lets air into the tank to help prevent any vacuum from forming. An easy way to check if your air hole is clogged is to simply loosen the cap while the trimmer is running – If performance improves, a replacement gas cap is your fix.

When filling your gas reserve make sure not to fill it beyond the recommended line – Not only can this be a fire/explosion hazard this can also keep your fuel tank from delivering the proper amount of air into the fuel lines, leading to stalls.

Fuel Filters Can Be Clogged

Fuel filters are typically located inside the gas tank of a hedge trimmer – These are small, cylindrical filters attached to one or more hoses leading from the gas tank to the main body of the trimmer. Over time these will fill up with gunk and residue – More so if you have left your weed trimmer sitting up with fuel left inside.

Fuel filters for a weed eater are cheap and easy to replace at home with only a few minutes worth of work; check your manufacturer’s instruction booklet or website for details on the process or, failing that, a quick search on Youtube with your product model should net you what you need.

Make Sure You Have the Right Fuel Mix

If using a two-stroke engine that requires you to mix your own fuel double-check the recommended ratio and make sure your mix is right. Your trimmer should come with instructions on exactly what sort of mix you should be using (and make sure not to mix more than about a month’s supply at a time – Again, fuel can go “bad” and become ineffective if left to sit).

Checking the Choke

The choke supplies fuel to the engine to help it crank up from a cold start; if your choke is on the wrong setting this can lead to stalls. Before you crank the engine make sure your choke is in it’s full, highest position. While starting to crank move the choke down to the half-choke point and then make sure it is completely disengaged once the engine is fully started.

If your choke is left in a high position while the trimmer’s engine is running this will cause it to cut out. Make sure your choke is not sticky/wobbly or faulty in any way; a broken choke must be replaced if damaged.

Readjust Your Carburettor’s Settings

Sputtering and stalls can also be caused by an ill-adjusted carburettor. Look for two small screws on the side of the carburettor labeled “L” or “Lo” (Low) and “H” or “Hi” (High) (these may be flat-head or phillips). “L” adjusts the weed trimmer’s fuel usage while idling and “H” adjusts the fuel for the trimmer while running at its highest speed.

To adjust, crank your trimmer and, starting with the “L” screw, turn it slowly in the counterclockwise direction until the trimmer’s engine begins to slow down – Note the position of the screw head before turning the screw back in the clockwise direction until the engine begins to slow down again. Note this position as well.

When making the final adjustment you want the screw head to be as directly between these two positions as possible; unfortunately it isn’t an exact science but nailing down a “good enough” position should be fairly easy. Once done with the “L” screw head move on to the “H” screw and repeat the same process.

Side note: If you have a hard time keeping the engine running while working on the carburettor settings it might be a good idea to recruit a friend to help you out – One of you can keep the trimmer active while the other checks the carburettor adjustments.

Cleaning Your Carburettor

While we don’t recommend breaking down and servicing a carburettor at home a deep cleaning is never a terrible idea and should probably be done once per season before storage. To remove your carburettor first find and remove your drain float – This should be attached with a series of either two or four screws.

Then remove the carburettor from your trimmer and spray thoroughly with carburettor cleaner, making sure to get in every divot, crack and crevice. Let this dry thoroughly before reattaching to your trimmer and then reattaching your float (note: be careful with your float, as an improper installation can lead to gas leaks).

If your carburettor is still not running smoothly after this cleaning it might need to be replaced or disassembled – While this can be done at home we thoroughly recommend taking it to a professional at this step unless you are absolutely certain you know what you’re getting into.

Weed trimmers are simple, two cycle engines that run a blade or a string reel to cut grass in small areas and to clean up corners in your landscaping projects. With the right kind of maintenance, a weed trimmer is easy to keep in good working condition.

When your weed trimmer will not stay running, run through the basic troubleshooting steps to get it working again. The machine may have run out of gas, which is easy to fix, but the problem may also be a maladjusted carburettor, which is also fairly easy to fix. It’s also a good idea to clean or replace the air filter.

Initial Troubleshooting Procedure

Check that the gas in your weed trimmer is filled to the right level and is fresh. Stale fuel is a common issue in weed trimmers. When a weed trimmer is stored for a long period of time, the gasoline will go bad. If the fuel has been in the tank for a few months, change it with fresh fuel.

If you have a weed trimmer where fuel and oil need to be mixed together, make sure the mixture is not too heavy either way. Follow the instructions on your engine oil container to get the right mixture. If you don’t buy pre-mixed fuel, do not mix more than you will be able to use within 30 days.

The Choke May Be On

Make sure your choke is in the correct position as you are running your weed trimmer. The choke supplies the fuel to the engine to aid the starting process when the trimmer is cold. When starting, the choke needs to be in the highest position, or full choke. As the engine attempts a start, the choke should be moved to the half choke position, then completely disengaged when the engine starts.

Having the choke in a high position as the trimmer is running will cause it to cut out. If you have a faulty choke that moves easily, or is stuck in the full position, you will not be able to run your weed trimmer properly and will have to replace the component.

How to adjust the carburettor on a craftsman weed eater

Adjusting the carburettor on a Weed Eater, or any two-cycle engine, is necessary from time to time. Carburettors can be finicky in engines that require an oil additive in the gasoline mixture.

Fortunately, it only takes a few minutes to adjust the small carburettor on a Weed Eater. You need to adjust your carburettor if the engine cuts out when idling or at high speed.

Look for a two small screws on your trimmer’s carburettor that has a slot for a flat head screwdriver. One screw will be marked H, for high speed, while the other will be marked L, for low speed. The high screw will adjust the fuel mixture given when the trimmer is running at its highest speed, and the low screw will control fuel mixture for the idle speed.

To adjust the L screw, start the weed trimmer and turn the screw counter clockwise until the speed of the engine decreases. Do this again clockwise. Remember these two points and position the screw so that it is somewhere between the two extremes.

Adjust the H screw the same way, but with the engine is running at full throttle. This will ensure that the fuel mixture of the engine is correct so that excess air or excess fuel will not cause the engine to cut out.

Step 1

Locate the two fuel-adjustment screws on the side of the carburettor. One will be labeled “Hi” and the other “Lo.” The “Hi” screw regulates the engine at full throttle and the “Lo” regulates the fuel when the engine is idling.

Step 2

Tighten the screws with a small Phillips screwdriver to position the needle end of the screws into the “jets” of the carburettor.

Step 3

Adjust the screws. Turn the “Hi” jet screw counter clockwise 1 1/2 turns. Turn the “Lo” screw 1 turn, counter clockwise. Pull out the choke and start the engine. It will sound a little rough, but try to keep the engine running by applying the gas throttle. The engine needs to be warm for a proper adjustment.

Step 4

Slowly turn the “Lo” screw counter clockwise until the engine idle smooths out. The engine should run smoothly without stalling or dying, but not so fast that it turns the head of the Weed Eater.

Step 5

Push the throttle to full open and observe the engine. If the engine sputters, turn the “Hi” screw clockwise less than ¼ turn until it smooths out. The exact adjustment of the “Hi” screw setting depends on the size of the load, the Weed Eater head and the fuel’s freshness.

Check this too: Homelite Weed Eater How to & Troubleshooting Guide

Craftsman 4 cycle weed eater won’t stay running

There are several reasons why a craftsman battery weed eater won’t stay running;

Old Fuel

A weed eater or trimmer needs fuel to run on. Just like how our body needs fresh food, weed eaters also need fresh fuel. Old fuel doesn’t properly flow to every part of the engine. It creates friction and stops the functions. So, a craftsman weed eater won’t stay running while using it.

To fix it, remove the old fuel and use the ethanol-free new fuel. Ensure the ratio of gas to oil according to the need. Usually, within 2 or 3 starts, the craftsman weed eater should start running. If it doesn’t start, make sure to contact a professional.

Clogged Fuel Filter

Fuel filters can clog up for sticky carbon residue. Using the wrong fuel ratio or having old fuel for a long time can cause clogged fuel filters. For this clog, fuel can’t pass through the needed place. This stalls the weed eater machine. So, to fix it, deep cleaning of the fuel filter needs to be done. Especially, give emphasis on cleaning all the sticky substances.

If it can’t be cleaned, replace the fuel filter. Lastly, before installing the filter, check for air filters too. A craftsman 25cc weed eater won’t stay running for this reason. Some debris can build up on the air filter because of the old fuel. Removing both can be a bit tricky so try to take professional help.

Piston, Muffler & Exhaust Port

Piston, muffler & exhaust port are three important parts after filters. A craftsman weed eater won’t stay on without them. Firstly, ensure a gap in the spark plug. Then start looking for carbon build-up above the piston. Mostly it forms crusty dirt over the piston. Try to remove it gently. And replace the piston in case of any worn out.

Afterward, look for a muffler and exhaust port. They both can also be clogged with debris from carbon. Don’t forget to look at the muffler surface. It can hold debris too. Lastly, look out for clogged or worn-out portions in the exhaust port. It would be really time-consuming if three of the parts are clogged. So it’s recommended to consult a professional.

Improper Gas Supply

Improper gas supply is a huge issue in a weed eater. Without proper gas supply definitely, a craftsman 4 cycle weed eater won’t stay running. The gas supply maintains the engine of the trimmer. Improper gas supply is caused for clogged components and leakage in the gas tank.

Commonly this problem happens due to gas tank leakage. Repairing the tank itself is not possible. So, it is recommended to completely change the tank with a new one.

Dirty Carburetor

At the fuel inlet, there is a carburetor plate. As it is closer to the fuel inlet, it can mostly have formed a clog over time. So, remove the carburetor and look for the dirt build-up. Always clean with a carb cleaner.

Ensure proper cleaning in each part, or else craftsman weed eater won’t stay running. Also, always stay alert while using the carb cleaner. You should wear eye protection as it would cause bad irritation to your eyes. Replace the carburetor if it can’t be cleaned.

Why is my battery craftsman weed eater not charging

There are very few special tricks to revive a defective charger or battery pack. But you can try one task that has worked for tired batteries. Try cycling the battery pack onto the charger in 2-3 second intervals for about 10 minutes, meaning place the battery on the charger then wait 2-3 seconds and then remove the battery pack for 2-3 seconds.

Craftsman weed eater Line Feeds Too Much or Continuously

A common trimmer symptom is if the line feeds continuously. If this occurs, there are multiple parts to check, such as the spool, cap, springs, and lever. Follow our repair guide to help you better identify and fix your problem accurately. If you need specific repair instructions related to your model, refer to the manual provided by the manufacturer.

Guards

The guard is located around the trimmer head and protects you from debris flying upwards and hitting you during use. The guard itself will not cause the line to advance continuously or get too long, but there is a blade located on this guard that breaks the line off, keeping it from getting too long.

Usually this vibrates off or gets dull over time. If left without a blade, the trimmer line will damage the guard, and you will have to replace the guard. The blade is bolted onto the guard. To replace the blade, remove the old one and install the new one.

Levers

Some trimmers are equipped with an auto-line spool controlled by a lever. This lever is located inside the trimmer head and works on centrifugal force, feeding out more line as the line wears away. The lever locks into nubs as it waits to release more line.

Over time, this lever can wear down and it will allow the line to feed out continuously. To replace this lever, remove the trimmer head cap and the spool. Insert a small screwdriver under the lever’s base and pop it off. Insert a new lever by just pressing it on. Finally, re-install the spool and cap.

Springs

The spring keeps pressure on the bump head cap and returns the cap to its original position after you bump it, to allow more string to advance. Over time, it can become weak and impact the performance of the wire feed. To replace this spring, remove the bump head cap and remove the old spring. Install the new spring by pressing it on the bump head then reinstall the bump head back into the spool.

Caps

The cap allows you to feed more line when you tap it on the ground. If this cap is broken or worn out over time, it can malfunction, causing too much line to feed out when you bump it. Depending on its damage, it could be getting hung up as it tries to return, allowing the line to continuously advance. To replace it, simply remove and replace the bump cap with a new one.

Spools

The spool houses the line for the trimmer and has the line wound around it. It is located inside the trimmer head. If the line is too thick or too thin it can continuously feed the line. Make sure you are using the correct line thickness rated for your machine.

Trimmer Heads

The trimmer head is the unit that houses the spool, cap and spring, and lever (in some models). If the trimmer head itself is damaged, it can cause the parts inside of it to malfunction to the point where replacing the inside parts will not work, requiring you to replace the entire trimmer head.

  • To remove the trimmer head, insert a small screwdriver or Allen wrench into the hole on the gear box, located just above the trimmer head.
  • Rotate the trimmer head until the screwdriver locks into place. On some models, you might have to lock the screwdriver in place against the washer, after it is locked inside the hole.
  • Remove the trimmer head by rotating it counterclockwise.

Trimmer heads are reversed-thread. Install the new trimmer head with the screwdriver or Allen wrench in place to prevent movement as you tighten the head down.

Craftsman weed eater dies when I give it gas

One reason why one of these trimmers may die at full throttle is that too much oil is in the gas, which causes poor combustion. Improper operation, including overuse of the choke, can also be responsible. Poor combustion produces carbon deposits that foul the spark plug and exhaust port, making the problem worse.

Operating Your Trimmer

When cold-starting a Stihl trimmer, you must move the control on the control grip to the “Start” position and turn the choke on by moving the lever to the “Choke” position. The choke restricts air flow to the carburetor, producing a fuel-rich mixture in the combustion chamber.

Once the trimmer starts, move the choke all the way in the opposite direction to open the carburetor and allow air to flow. If you don’t do this, the engine will sputter and die when you open the throttle, because too much fuel is in the combustion chamber to ignite.

Restoring Air Circulation

One of the consequences of operating a Stihl trimmer with the choke on or a fuel mixture with too much oil is that the engine smokes, filling the spark arrestor screen with carbon deposits that block air flow. You must clean this screen periodically to prevent the engine from stalling.

It’s just as important to replace the intake air filter regularly or clean it by spraying it with compressed air — if it’s the felt type — or washing it with soapy water if it’s the foam type. Always close the choke before removing the air filter to keep dirt out of the carburetor.

Fuel Filter and Gas Cap

The trimmer can sputter and stall if it isn’t getting enough fuel, and that can happen simply because the fuel filter is dirty. Fuel filters are inexpensive, and it’s more practical to replace a dirty one than it is to try to clean it. On most models, it’s in the gas tank or on the cap.

While cleaning the filter, try running the trimmer with the loosened cap. If it doesn’t stall, the cap vent hole may be plugged; if so, you should replace the cap and the filter.

Adjusting the Carburetor

The carburetor is factory-adjusted for sea level, and if you use the trimmer at high altitudes, it may not get enough air for proper combustion. Most Stihl trimmer carburetors have adjustment screws for high- and low-speed operation and an idle adjustment.

The manufacturer’s recommended adjustment procedure is to screw both the high-speed screw — “H” — and low-speed screw — “L” — clockwise until they seat, then back each off a complete turn.

After that, adjust the “H” screw no more than one-quarter turn in either direction. Make the adjustments while the engine is warm.

Craftsman weed eater auto feed not working

The automatic feeding system on a Weed Eater is designed to force more line out when it’s needed. Depending on the model, this occurs when either the head is tapped or the line gets too low and the centrifugal force pushes the line out.

In either case, the basic operating systems are the same. Most of the time, when the feeding system isn’t working, a jam or clog is blocking the line from exiting. Clearing away this jam and check the feeding system for damage will help solve most automatic feed problems.

How to Fix the Automatic Feed on a Weed Eater

Things You’ll Need

  • Rag
  • Pliers
  • Replacement parts (as needed)

Step 1

Set the Weed Eater atop a workbench so the head’s bottom is facing up. Press down on the center knob and twist it slightly. Pull up on the knob to take the spool out of the head.

Step 2

Unwind any string still left on the spool. Check the string for crisscrossing and overlaps, as this will stop the automatic feed system from working. Wipe the spool and inside the Weed Eater’s head with the rag. Check the spool for any cracks, holes or other damage. If the spool is damaged it won’t spin inside the head and the feeding system will stop working.

Step 3

Pull the spool retainer, a metal clasp at the center of the head, out of the head with the needle-nosed pliers. Slide the return spring out of the head’s center. Check the spool retainer for signs of damage. Replace if it’s cracked, bent or broken. Replace the spring if the ends are bent, the spring has lost its elasticity or is damaged in any way.

Step 4

Reassemble the head parts in reverse order. Set the spring onto the center. Push the retainer into the center. Rewind the cutting string around the spool, keeping the line tight and the rows even. Fit the spool back into the head. If the automatic feed still isn’t working, repeat these disassembly steps and remove and replace the entire cutting head.

Why Does the Line in My Weed Eater Keep Getting Stuck?

Many Weed Eater trimmers, like trimmers made by other manufacturers, include a head that automatically advances the line, or string, that cuts weeds and grass. Other models from Poulan Pro — the company that manufactures the Weed Eater brand — have a bump-and-feed feature that allows the line to advance when the head is tapped on the ground. When the line won’t advance in your Weed Eater, the cause could have to do with the line you’re using, the way you loaded it or your bumping technique.

Common solutions for: Craftsman String trimmer string line won’t feed

Trimmer Head

Try removing the trimmer head and cleaning it thoroughly. If the trimmer head is worn out, replace it.

Trimmer Line

The trimmer line might be the wrong size. If the trimmer line is too thick or too thin for the trimmer head, the trimmer line won’t feed. Make sure you are using the correct trimmer line for your string trimmer.

Trimmer Housing

The trimmer housing might be cracked, chipped or broken. Inspect the trimmer housing for damage. If the trimmer housing is damaged, replace the trimmer head.

Choosing Line

The diameter of the line that can be used in a Weed Eater trimmer head — or any trimmer head — has a limit. Many types of trimmer line are available, including serrated line and line with a non-circular cross-section.

You can take advantage of the enhanced cutting power of these different types of lines as long as you don’t use one that exceeds the line diameter range for your trimmer’s head. If the line is too large for the head, then the line won’t advance. Check your Weed Eater’s operator’s manual or the Weed Eater website for the proper line diameter to use for your model.

Loading the Line

Some trimmer heads accept two separate lengths of line, each anchored to a separate hole in the spool hub. The procedure for winding the two lengths of line usually requires holding them together and winding them at the same time; when doing so, avoid allowing one line to cross over itself or the other line.

The line will stick at such a cross-over point. Whether your Weed Eater trimmer takes one length of line or two lengths, wind the line in the direction of the arrow on the spool. A line won’t advance if it was wound the other direction.

Using the Bump Technique

If your Weed Eater trimmer has a bump-and-feed head, then its line won’t advance by itself, as it would on an automatic-feed model. Periodically tap the head on the ground to advance the line. It’s important, though, that the head rotates at full speed when you tap it because the centrifugal force of the spinning is what advances the string.

Always tap the trimmer head on a soft surface, such as grass, and not on a hard surface, including concrete and wood, or you may damage the trimmer head. It’s better to bump the head more often than less often. A blade on the guard automatically cuts the line to the right length.

Solving Short Line and Head Malfunctions

The line of a Weed Eater trimmer head won’t advance if it is too short because not enough centrifugal force acts on it. That situation can happen if you don’t tap the head often enough or the line becomes sheared by a piece of wire or a root.

Running the trimmer with line that is 50 percent or less of the recommended length can cause the head to turn too quickly, which can wear out the engine. A broken spring also can be responsible for failure of the line to advance. The spring can be replaced by removing the spool from the head or by removing the head from the drive shaft, depending on the Weed Eater trimmer model.

What is the Gas-to-Oil Ratio for a Weed Trimmer

a proper mix to run well. If there’s too little oil, the engine will overheat and seize up. If there’s too much oil, your engine will smoke, which can get the muffler all gummed up. Because weed trimmers do not have separate compartments for gas and oil, you must get the mix just right in order to ensure a healthy garden tool.

The Right Ratio

Most weed trimmers require oil to be added to the gas. Unlike engines that have separate gas and oil reservoirs, a weed trimmer’s engine runs on a mix. This keeps the engine lubricated at all times. You should never use straight gas in a two-cycle engine because that will ruin it within minutes.

The make and model of your weed trimmer will determine the correct fuel-to-oil mixture. Some models, such as Stihl, require a ratio of 50:1, while others, including Weed Eater, require a 40:1 mixture and still others, including Ryobi, run on a 32:1 mixture. Check your owner’s manual to make sure you’re mixing in the proper ratio. Otherwise, you could harm the engine.

Mix It and Shake It

Once you’ve figured out the correct fuel-to-oil ratio, it’s simple to calculate the amount of gasoline and the amount of oil you will need. If your fuel-to-oil mix ratio is 40:1, for example, you will use 40 parts of gasoline to 1 gallon of oil. There are 128 oz. in a gallon. Divide 128 oz. by the mix ratio of 40, which equals 3.2 ounces of gasoline.

Mix 3.2 oz. of engine oil with 1 gallon of regular gasoline. Because the oil will separate from the gasoline over time, thoroughly shake your oil and gas mixture before refueling your weed trimmer. Be careful when you do this so as not to get the oil and gas all over the place.

Use the Right Fuel

Make sure to buy regular unleaded gasoline and not a diesel fuel. It’s all right to use gasoline that is blended with a maximum 10 percent alcohol. But if you want to use alternative fuels, such as ethanol or methanol, just be sure they are made up in a 10:2 ratio. If you want the safest fuel possible, purchase premixed fuel supplied by the company that manufactured the trimmer. Stihl, for example, supplies premixed fuel for all its gas-powered tools.

Do not store the trimmer with this mixture inside, unless you add a fuel stabilizer or you use a premixed fuel, which typically already includes a stabilizer. Alcohol-blended fuels can attract moisture and form acids. That can damage the fuel system and clog the carburetor, and cleaning the carburetor is a job you don’t want to do. Also, keep in mind that fuels with more than 10 percent alcohol won’t work well with your weed trimmer and can decrease the power of the engine, causing it to run erratically. Manufacturer-supplied pre-mixed fuels are typically alcohol-free.

How to replace the throttle cable of a craftsman weed eater

  • Before you replace the throttle cable on your edger first make sure the engine has cooled.
  • Next, remove the wire and boot from the spark plug to prevent the engine from accidentally starting.
  • Use a t-25 torx bit screwdriver to remove the screw securing the throttle cable to the air box.
  • Note the location of the z-end of the cable on the throttle plate then detach the cable.
  • Now remove the screws securing the two halves of the edger handle together.
  • Pull off the bottom half of the handle.
  • Remove the throttle cable from the trigger assembly and detach the handle tube clamp to fully release the cable.
  • Secure the new cable under the tube clamp then attach the barrel end to the trigger as you align the cable in the handle.
  • If necessary, you can realign the trigger on the handle by depressing the spring and pushing the trigger into place.
  • Realign the bottom half of the handle and replace the screws to secure.
  • Attach the z-end of the throttle cable to the appropriate hole in the throttle plate.
  • Insert the cable into the slot in the air box and replace the screw to secure.
  • With the repair completed reattach the spark plug wire and boot and your edger should be ready for use.

How to Change Oil in a Craftsman 4-Cycle Weed Eater

Items needed

  • Rag
  • Screwdriver
  • Oil catch container
  • SAE 30 SF
  • Funnel

The Craftsman 4-cycle weed-eating trimmer requires regular maintenance much like any other piece of yard equipment. Regular tuneups keep the trimmer operating at peak efficiency, while regular oil changes keep moving parts in the engine lubricated properly. Changing the oil in a 4-cycle weed eater is much like any other type of gasoline-powered trimmer. Bottles of oil specifically for trimmers are available at home improvement centers. If you cannot find the small bottles, purchase a standard size bottle and measure out the quantity necessary for the engine.

Step 1

Pull the spark plug wire off the spark plug. Find the oil fill cap on the rear of the weed eater. Wipe down the cap and surrounding area to keep dirt and grime from accidentally falling into the crankcase while changing oil.

Step 2

Twist the oil fill cap counterclockwise with your fingers and remove it from the trimmer. If the oil fill cap is too difficult to turn by hand, insert the shank of a screwdriver between the two raised portions of the cap. Use the screwdriver as a handle to turn the cap counterclockwise until it’s loose enough to turn by hand.

Step 3

Pick up the weed eater and position the open oil fill hole over an oil catch container. Hold the trimmer upside down with the open oil fill hole pointing toward the container. Allow the oil to drain completely. Once the oil drains, hold the trimmer upright and wipe excess oil from around the oil fill hole, using the rag.

Step 4

Place the trimmer on a raised flat surface such as a workbench, with the trimmer head hanging over the edge. Pour 3/8 cup of SAE 30 SF motor oil into the oil fill hole. Insert a funnel into the oil fill hole, if necessary, to help pour the oil without spilling it on the engine.

Step 5

Check the oil level, which should be at the lowest thread on the inside of the oil fill hole. Add oil, if necessary. Twist the oil fill cap clockwise into the oil fill hole until it’s tight.

Note: If the trimmer has not been used recently, start the engine and allow it to warm up. Once the engine is warm, turn it off. This helps to remove impurities. Craftsman recommends changing the oil after the first 10 hours of operation and once every 25 hours of operation after that.

How to clean and maintain your gas craftsman weed eater

Properly maintaining your string trimmer is essential.

Step 1: Clean and Inspect the Trimmer

Clean the string trimmer to keep it performing well. Dust, grime and caked-on grass clippings build up on the debris shield and trimmer head and can lead to inefficiency and possible malfunction if not cleaned. Wipe the trimmer parts down with a rag after use and before storing it.

Do a deeper cleaning with a stiff brush and a damp cloth periodically. Use cotton swabs lightly dampened with machine oil to clean exhausts, intakes, and other hard-to-clean areas.

Note: Use an air compressor or a can of compressed air to blow air into the trimmer engine vents and crevices to remove dirt and dust from inside. Remember to inspect your string trimmer for any signs of wear or damage when you’re cleaning it.

Safety Warnings

Before cleaning or maintaining your string trimmer—particularly when handling the business end—always remove the spark plug from a gasoline-powered unit. Unplug the power cord or detach the battery from an electric unit.

Note

Store your trimmer and accessories somewhere where they will be protected from dust and moisture, preferably in a garage or tool shed. This not only keeps them protected, it also keeps them organized so you can easily find the tool you need when you need it.

Remember to keep the instruction manual. Not only is it a great guide and resource on how to properly and safely use your string trimmer, the manual also has valuable information on how to care for it, find replacement parts and other important pieces of information.

Step 2: Replace Trimmer Line

No matter if your trimmer model is gas-powered or electric, both require the replacement of the trimmer line periodically. The type of head on your trimmer does determine how you replace the line though. You will most likely have a single or dual-line head. This means that there will be one or two protruding pieces of line for cutting. Follow the instructions from your trimmer’s manufacturer on how to replace the line.

Note: Keep surplus trimmer line around so that you don’t run out and have to stop working to go buy more.

When replacing the trimmer line, take this time to clean the trimmer head. Use a damp rag to remove caked on grass and debris.

Step 3: Check/Change Oil and Fuel

If you’re using a gas-powered string trimmer, you need to maintain its engine by considering its fuel/oil requirements. Gas-powered string trimmers use oil and gasoline to function, with some using a fuel/oil mixture, depending on the type of engine. Four-cycle engines have separate gas and oil reservoirs, while 2-cycle engines operate on a mixture of gasoline and 2-cycle engine oil.

Consult the manufacturer’s instructions on the proper fuel/oil ratio (typically 50:1 or 40:1) if you own a trimmer with a 2-cycle engine. Use a funnel to pour the fuel and 2-cycle oil into a small gas can to mix them together at the correct ratio. Fill the trimmer’s fuel reservoir when needed.

When using a 4-cycle trimmer, check fuel and oil levels before each use. Remove the spark plug before doing any maintenance. This will ensure the trimmer is completely deactivated. Your particular trimmer model will determine how you can check its oil level.

Some models will have an oil level window, or a dipstick; in lieu of either of those, you can simply open the oil reservoir and peer inside to check the oil level. Shine a flashlight on the opening if you need help seeing inside. Fill the reservoir with the manufacturer-recommended type and amount of oil when needed. Use a funnel for spill-free filling.

As with a motor vehicle, the oil will turn dark when it‘s time to change it. Remove the reservoir plug and position the trimmer so that the old oil will drain into an oil pan or another container.

Once all of the oil has drained, use a rag to clean up anything that spilled and then fill the reservoir with the appropriate oil type by pouring the oil through a funnel into the oil reservoir. Check the oil level again to ensure that the proper amount has been added and then close the reservoir by inserting its plug.

Step 4: Check/Replace Air Filter

Gas-powered models also require that you check the engine air filter. Read the manufacturer’s instructions to determine where your air filter is located and how to access it. Check to see if the filter is covered with dust and debris. Some filters are washable and reusable. Check your owner’s manual for instructions on how to clean the filter. If the filter is unsalvageable or damaged, replace it.

Step 5: Store Trimmer Appropriately

Where and how you store your string trimmer when not in use is essential to keeping it in prime working order. Store your trimmer out of the elements in a well-ventilated tool shed or garage.

Do not store gas or gas/oil mixtures for the trimmer inside your home or basement. Fumes can build up and create a dangerous situation. Be sure that the trimmer and other tools are not accessible by children.

Wait for the engine to cool before putting the trimmer away. When storing your trimmer at the end of the season, remove all dirt, grease and debris from the trimmer using a stiff-bristle brush.

Tighten all screws and nuts. Drain the fuel tank, remove the spark plug and add a small amount of oil into the cylinder. Pull the starting cord a couple of times to distribute the oil. Reinstall the spark plug, but don’t connect the ignition cable.

How to clean and maintain your electric craftsman weed eater

Regular maintenance is one of the most important things you can do to keep your lawn equipment in good shape. String-line trimmers and weed wackers are no exceptions. A large part of this maintenance involves keeping the equipment clean and replacing parts that wear-out. It’s not too hard, and it’ll pay-off by extending the life of your trimmer.

1) Turn It Off

First, you want to ensure the trimmer is turned off and that it will not start back up while you’re cleaning it. For corded electric trimmers, unplug from the power supply. If you’re using a battery-powered trimmer, removed the battery.

And for gasoline-powered models, disconnect the spark plug wire. Now you can safely clean the trimmer without it accidentally turning on and injuring you.

2) Brush Dirt Off

Any tool you’re using to cut grass and weeds will get dirty. String-line trimmers are often covered in dust, dirt, and pieces of the plants you were cutting. You don’t have to clean them after every use, but try not to let the debris build up too much.

A stiff brush is usually all you need to scrub debris off your trimmer’s cutting head and handle. At the end of the season, dip the brush in warm, soapy water to give the trimmer a more thorough cleaning.

Following these four steps on a regular schedule will prevent damage caused by debris building up on your trimmer. Keeping the trimmer clean means less strain on the engine. It also helps prevent rust in any metal components.

Signs the weed eater trigger is broken

The trigger controls the engine’s RPMs. Below are signs your trigger is broken;

Housings

The housing holds the throttle cable, spring, and trigger (also known as a lever). If anything inside the housing breaks, it can impact the function of the trigger. Remove the screws on the handle and separate the two halves of the handle.

Look for any parts that are out of place that could indicate damage inside the handle. Inspect the mounting pin for the trigger as well as where the spring mounts, for any damage that could impact these parts from working properly. If there is damage, replace the handle.

Remove the cable, trigger, and spring from the handle. Make note of the orientation of the spring. Take a photo with your phone so you can have it for a reference if needed. Install the throttle cable back into the trigger, then install the spring and reposition the trigger on the mounting pin.

Ensure the throttle cable is seated properly inside the handle and rejoin the two halves of the handle.

Springs

The spring returns the trigger back to its normal position once you take your finger off. If the trigger does not return, your spring is broken and needs to be replaced. Separate the two halves of the handle.

Make note of the oThe spring returns the trigger back to its normal position once you take your finger off. If the trigger does not return, your spring is broken and needs to be replaced.

Separate the two halves of the handle. Make note of the orientation of the spring, or take a photo, for easier reassembly. Remove the trigger and spring, and install a new spring, making sure it is installed and seated correctly. Reposition the trigger on the mounting pin.

Make sure the throttle cable is seated properly inside the handle and rejoin the two halves of the handle back together.rientation of the spring, or take a photo, for easier reassembly.

Remove the trigger and spring, and install a new spring, making sure it is installed and seated correctly. Reposition the trigger on the mounting pin. Ensure the throttle cable is seated properly inside the handle and rejoin the two halves of the handle.

Cable

The cable runs from the trigger to the throttle control on the carburetor. When you pull the trigger, the cable opens the throttle valve inside the carburetor, allowing more fuel into the engine. This increases the RPM. Over time, this cable can stretch, fray, or break, causing trigger failure. Separate the two halves of the handle. Make note of the orientation of the spring, and remove the spring and throttle cable from the trigger.

Remove the cable from the handle. Remove the cover from the engine that will allow you to access the carburetor to remove the cable. Remove the screws securing the choke plate and carburetor to the engine.

Maneuver the carburetor around to slide the cable out; fasten down if you cannot get the cable out with the carburetor.

Once the cable is detached from the carburetor, remove the cable from the trimmer and discard it. Install the new cable, hooking it back up to the carburetor. Fasten down the carburetor and choke plate. You should remove and install a new gasket under the carburetor for a proper seal at this point. Re-install any covers you removed to gain access to the carburetor.

Install the throttle cable into the trigger, then re-install the spring and reposition the trigger on the mounting pin. Ensure the throttle cable is seated properly inside the handle and rejoin the two halves of the handle.

How to replace the trigger on a craftsman weed eater

If the trigger is not working, it may have broken off inside the housing. The trigger is made of plastic and can break over time. To check and repair, simply remove the screws on the handle that house the trigger. Separate the two halves of the handle. Inspect the trigger for any breakage.

Make note of the orientation of the spring; we suggest you take a picture with your phone to use as a reference. Remove the spring and the throttle cable from the trigger.

With the new trigger, install the throttle cable first, then re-install the spring and reposition the trigger on the mounting pin. Make sure the throttle cable is seated properly inside the handle and rejoin the two halves of the handle back together.

Oscar

In his spare time, Oscar loves tinkering with electronics. Solar panels, wiring, old TVs and sometimes DIY powerwalls. When he is not busy trying not to electrocute himself, you can find him in the garden tending to his vegetables and chickens.

Recent Posts